Childhood Trauma, Criminality and Prison Reentry

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DC Public Safety Radio and Television won the Government Customer Service Community of Practice (Cgov) 2014 Overall Excellence and Best Use of technology Awards. See conta.cc/1qiBV74  .

DC Public Safety won awards for best podcast and audio from the National Association of Government Communicators in 2014, see http://www.nagconline.org/documents/NAGC-2014-Awards-Program.pdf . We are finalists for two new awards for 2015 for best podcast and audio.

DC Public Safety Television won three awards for public affairs television in 2014 from CTV and DCTV.

Welcome to “DC Public Safety” – Radio and television shows, blog and transcripts on crime, criminal offenders, and the criminal justice system.

We received 230,000 visits in 2014.

Page views range from 653,000 to 1.4 million a year.

This is radio show 248.

The portal site for “DC Public Safety” is http://media.csosa.gov

Subscribe to “DC Public Safety” through iTunes.

Current Radio Program:

We interviewed Dana Goldstein, a writer for the The Marshall Project who wrote, “Meet Our Prisoners.”

Overview:

“It is notoriously difficult for social scientists to study people who have recently left prison. They move often, don’t have stable phone numbers, rarely hold steady jobs, and often end up back behind bars.  And scholars who have attempted to follow a smaller group of former prisoners over a discrete period of time have struggled with high rates of attrition, with up to two-thirds of their subjects disappearing before a study ends.”

“That’s why the Boston Reentry Study, led by three leading scholars — sociologist Bruce Western of Harvard, criminologist Anthony Braga of Rutgers, and Rhiana Kohl of the Massachusetts Department of Corrections — is unique. The scale of the study is small, tracking 122 men and women who were released from state prisons to Boston neighborhoods between 2012 and 2013. But study retention over the course of 12 months, at 90 percent, was unprecedented.”

“The resulting working papers provide not only data, but an almost literary glimpse into the life histories of incarcerated people, from childhood through prison and beyond.”

Dana Goldstein writes Justice Lab and reports on the intersection of education and criminal justice. Her work has appeared in Slate, The Atlantic, and other magazines, and she is the author of The Teacher Wars: A History of America’s Most Embattled Profession.

“Meet Our Prisoners” is available at https://www.themarshallproject.org/2015/04/02/meet-our-prisoners.

The Marshall Project is available at https://www.themarshallproject.org/.

Special Announcements:

A top priority for the Department of Justice is to invest in scientific research to ensure that the Department is both tough and smart on crime. The Office of Justice Programs’ CrimeSolutions.gov website shapes rigorous research into a central, reliable, and credible resource to inform practitioners and policy makers about what works in criminal justice.

A new website lists and evaluates prisoner re-entry programs nationwide. Launched by the Urban Institute, the Council of State Governments, and the John Jay College of Criminal Justice Prisoner Reentry Institute, the “What Works Clearinghouse” can be seen at http://nationalreentryresourcecenter.org/what_works.

The National Reentry Resource Center is a project of the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, US Department of Justice. Please see the Center’s website at http://www.nationalreentryresourcecenter.org/. Please see “Federal Interagency Reentry Council Launches Website, Releases Myth-Buster Series” on the front page of the site (see announcements). CSOSA is a member of the Council. Several requesters have asked for national research on reentry.

The Office of Justice Program’s National Institute of Justice reentry research portfolio supports the evaluation of innovative reentry programs. To access these studies and NIJ’s entire reentry research portfolio visit www.nij.gov/nij/topics/corrections/reentry/welcome.htm .

The Office of Violence Against Women offers stalking response tips for corrections, prosecutors, judges, law enforcement, victims and victim advocates. They are posted on OVW’s website at www.ovw.usdoj.gov .

The National Institute of Corrections Information Center is one of the largest repositories for corrections research and information in the country. See  www.nicic.gov/Library.

Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency:

We welcome your comments or suggestions at leonard.sipes@csosa.gov.

The website for the Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency is http://www.csosa.gov/.

The program is hosted by Leonard Sipes. The producer is Timothy Barns.

Comments offered on “DC Public Safety” television and radio programs are the opinions of participants and do not necessarily represent the policies of CSOSA or other government agencies.

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Law Enforcement and Justice Communications-President’s Task Force on Policing

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DC Public Safety Radio and Television won the Government Customer Service Community of Practice (Cgov) 2014 Overall Excellence and Best Use of technology Awards. See conta.cc/1qiBV74  .

DC Public Safety won awards for best podcast and audio from the National Association of Government Communicators in 2014, see http://www.nagconline.org/documents/NAGC-2014-Awards-Program.pdf . We are finalists for two new awards for 2015 for best podcast and audio.

DC Public Safety Television won three awards for public affairs television in 2014 from CTV and DCTV.

Welcome to “DC Public Safety” – Radio and television shows, blog and transcripts on crime, criminal offenders, and the criminal justice system.

We received 230,000 visits in 2014.

Page views range from 653,000 to 1.4 million a year.

This is radio show 248.

The portal site for “DC Public Safety” is http://media.csosa.gov

Subscribe to “DC Public Safety” through iTunes.

Current Radio Program:

The President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing was created to improve the delivery of law enforcement services while building community trust. A basic tenet of the report is improved communications; what can police agencies (and the entire justice system) do to build trust and legitimacy?

Selected quotes from the report:

“Research demonstrates that these principles lead to relationships in which the community trusts that officers are honest, unbiased, benevolent, and lawful. The community therefore feels obligated to follow the law and the dictates of legal authorities and is more willing to cooperate with and engage those authorities because it believes that it shares a common set of interests and values with the police.”

“Implementing new technologies can give police departments an opportunity to fully engage and educate communities in a dialogue about their expectations for transparency, accountability, and privacy.”

“Another technology relatively new to law enforcement is social media. Social media is a communication tool the police can use to engage the community on issues of importance to both and to gauge community sentiment regarding agency policies and practices.”

What are the implications of the development of a justice-based digital communications strategy? Are we within the justice system capable of effective digital interaction and measurement efforts? Are there institutions that can assist?

Answering these questions are Ted Gest, Washington Bureau Chief of “The Crime Report,” a daily summation of crime news plus original reporting and Deborah Wenger, Director of Undergraduate Journalism and Associate Professor, Meek School of Journalism, University of Mississippi.

The President’s Task Force report is available at http://www.cops.usdoj.gov/pdf/taskforce/TaskForce_FinalReport.pdf.

The Crime Report is available at http://thecrimereport.org.

Debora Wenger’s blog is at http://advancingthestory.com.

The previous show onThe President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing is available at http://media.csosa.gov/podcast/audio/2015/03/presidents-task-force-on-21st-century-policing-laurie-robinson/.

Special Announcements:

A top priority for the Department of Justice is to invest in scientific research to ensure that the Department is both tough and smart on crime. The Office of Justice Programs’ CrimeSolutions.gov website shapes rigorous research into a central, reliable, and credible resource to inform practitioners and policy makers about what works in criminal justice.

A new website lists and evaluates prisoner re-entry programs nationwide. Launched by the Urban Institute, the Council of State Governments, and the John Jay College of Criminal Justice Prisoner Reentry Institute, the “What Works Clearinghouse” can be seen at http://nationalreentryresourcecenter.org/what_works.

The National Reentry Resource Center is a project of the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, US Department of Justice. Please see the Center’s website at http://www.nationalreentryresourcecenter.org/. Please see “Federal Interagency Reentry Council Launches Website, Releases Myth-Buster Series” on the front page of the site (see announcements). CSOSA is a member of the Council. Several requesters have asked for national research on reentry.

The Office of Justice Program’s National Institute of Justice reentry research portfolio supports the evaluation of innovative reentry programs. To access these studies and NIJ’s entire reentry research portfolio visit www.nij.gov/nij/topics/corrections/reentry/welcome.htm .

The Office of Violence Against Women offers stalking response tips for corrections, prosecutors, judges, law enforcement, victims and victim advocates. They are posted on OVW’s website at www.ovw.usdoj.gov .

The National Institute of Corrections Information Center is one of the largest repositories for corrections research and information in the country. See  www.nicic.gov/Library.

Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency:

We welcome your comments or suggestions at leonard.sipes@csosa.gov.

The website for the Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency is http://www.csosa.gov/.

The program is hosted by Leonard Sipes. The producer is Timothy Barns.

Comments offered on “DC Public Safety” television and radio programs are the opinions of participants and do not necessarily represent the policies of CSOSA or other government agencies.

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Offenders Impacted by Violence-Effects on Reentry-Urban Institute

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DC Public Safety Radio and Television won the Government Customer Service Community of Practice (Cgov) 2014 Overall Excellence and Best Use of technology Awards. See conta.cc/1qiBV74  .

DC Public Safety won awards for best podcast and audio from the National Association of Government Communicators in 2014, see http://www.nagconline.org/documents/NAGC-2014-Awards-Program.pdf . We are finalists for two new awards for 2015 for best podcast and audio.

DC Public Safety Television won three awards for public affairs television in 2014 from CTV and DCTV.

Welcome to “DC Public Safety” – Radio and television shows, blog and transcripts on crime, criminal offenders, and the criminal justice system.

We received 230,000 visits in 2014.

Page views range from 653,000 to 1.4 million a year.

This is radio show 247.

The portal site for “DC Public Safety” is http://media.csosa.gov

Subscribe to “DC Public Safety” through iTunes.

Current Radio Program:

Janine Zweig is a senior fellow in the Justice Policy Center at the Urban Institute.  She and others wrote, “Using General Strain Theory to Explore the Effects of Prison Victim Victimization Experiences on Later Offending and Substance Abuse.” The research explores the connection of violence and threats of violence while in prison to later dysfunction and recidivism.

From the study, “We examine the relationship between victimization during incarceration and the likelihood of former prisoners’ subsequent criminal behavior and substance use from a general strain theory (GST) perspective. Data from the multi-site evaluation of the Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiative were used, involving interviews with 543 men and 168 women in 12 states at four time points: once before prison release and 3 times after release. Path analyses show support for GST by indicating that prisoners who are physically assaulted or threatened have negative emotional reactions to such experiences, specifically hostility and depression, which increases their likelihood of violent criminal behavior and substance use after release.”

“Specifically, in-prison victimization leads to hostility once prisoners are released to the community and this hostility, at least in part, leads to criminal behavior, including violent criminal behavior. In-prison victimization also leads to depression upon release, and this depression, at least in part, leads to substance use.”

The program also addressed a non-custodial study and the effects of community and family violence before contact with the criminal justice system.

The website for the Urban Institute is http://urban.org .

Special Announcements:

A top priority for the Department of Justice is to invest in scientific research to ensure that the Department is both tough and smart on crime. The Office of Justice Programs’ CrimeSolutions.gov website shapes rigorous research into a central, reliable, and credible resource to inform practitioners and policy makers about what works in criminal justice.

A new website lists and evaluates prisoner re-entry programs nationwide. Launched by the Urban Institute, the Council of State Governments, and the John Jay College of Criminal Justice Prisoner Reentry Institute, the “What Works Clearinghouse” can be seen at http://nationalreentryresourcecenter.org/what_works.

The National Reentry Resource Center is a project of the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, US Department of Justice. Please see the Center’s website at http://www.nationalreentryresourcecenter.org/. Please see “Federal Interagency Reentry Council Launches Website, Releases Myth-Buster Series” on the front page of the site (see announcements). CSOSA is a member of the Council. Several requesters have asked for national research on reentry.

The Office of Justice Program’s National Institute of Justice reentry research portfolio supports the evaluation of innovative reentry programs. To access these studies and NIJ’s entire reentry research portfolio visit www.nij.gov/nij/topics/corrections/reentry/welcome.htm .

The Office of Violence Against Women offers stalking response tips for corrections, prosecutors, judges, law enforcement, victims and victim advocates. They are posted on OVW’s website at www.ovw.usdoj.gov .

The National Institute of Corrections Information Center is one of the largest repositories for corrections research and information in the country. See  www.nicic.gov/Library.

Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency:

We welcome your comments or suggestions at leonard.sipes@csosa.gov.

The website for the Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency is http://www.csosa.gov/.

The program is hosted by Leonard Sipes. The producer is Timothy Barns.

Comments offered on “DC Public Safety” television and radio programs are the opinions of participants and do not necessarily represent the policies of CSOSA or other government agencies.

Share

Crime Victims and Offender Reentry-National Institute of Corrections

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DC Public Safety Radio and Television won the Government Customer Service Community of Practice (Cgov) 2014 Overall Excellence and Best Use of technology Awards. See conta.cc/1qiBV74  .

DC Public Safety won awards for best podcast and audio from the National Association of Government Communicators in 2014, see http://www.nagconline.org/documents/NAGC-2014-Awards-Program.pdf . We are finalists for two new awards for 2015 for best podcast and audio.

DC Public Safety Television won three awards for public affairs television in 2014 from CTV and DCTV.

Welcome to “DC Public Safety” – Radio and television shows, blog and transcripts on crime, criminal offenders, and the criminal justice system.

We received 230,000 visits in 2014.

Page views range from 653,000 to 1.4 million a year.

This is radio show 247.

The portal site for “DC Public Safety” is http://media.csosa.gov

Subscribe to “DC Public Safety” through iTunes.

Current Radio Program:

With so much focus on the 700,000 people returning to communities each year after serving sentences of incarceration, little attention has been paid to how reentry can affect victims of crimes. In a televised broadcast, the National Institute of Corrections set the stage for opening dialogue about this important issue. Jurisdictions were challenged to review how they approached victims’ services and address how their staff were trained to respond to victim requests. Now with greater awareness prompted throughout the field on crime victims’ rights and the obligation of the corrections field to provide services and protection, today’s radio show continues the dialogue by highlighting promising programs throughout the country that are successfully integrating victims in the reentry process. The show also identifies resources and funding opportunities for jurisdictions wishing to improve victim serves programming in their own areas.

Guests of the show include Lorie Brisbin, Correctional Program Specialist at the National Institute of Corrections and Anne Seymour, a national crime victim advocate.

The victim services broadcast and participant guide are available from the National Institute of Corrections at http://nicic.gov/library/029682. The website for the National Institute of Corrections is http://www.nicic.gov.

This program was produced by Donna Ledbetter of the Director’s Office of National Institute of Corrections.

Special Announcements:

A top priority for the Department of Justice is to invest in scientific research to ensure that the Department is both tough and smart on crime. The Office of Justice Programs’ CrimeSolutions.gov website shapes rigorous research into a central, reliable, and credible resource to inform practitioners and policy makers about what works in criminal justice.

A new website lists and evaluates prisoner re-entry programs nationwide. Launched by the Urban Institute, the Council of State Governments, and the John Jay College of Criminal Justice Prisoner Reentry Institute, the “What Works Clearinghouse” can be seen at http://nationalreentryresourcecenter.org/what_works.

The National Reentry Resource Center is a project of the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, US Department of Justice. Please see the Center’s website at http://www.nationalreentryresourcecenter.org/. Please see “Federal Interagency Reentry Council Launches Website, Releases Myth-Buster Series” on the front page of the site (see announcements). CSOSA is a member of the Council. Several requesters have asked for national research on reentry.

The Office of Justice Program’s National Institute of Justice reentry research portfolio supports the evaluation of innovative reentry programs. To access these studies and NIJ’s entire reentry research portfolio visit www.nij.gov/nij/topics/corrections/reentry/welcome.htm .

The Office of Violence Against Women offers stalking response tips for corrections, prosecutors, judges, law enforcement, victims and victim advocates. They are posted on OVW’s website at www.ovw.usdoj.gov .

The National Institute of Corrections Information Center is one of the largest repositories for corrections research and information in the country. See  www.nicic.gov/Library.

Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency:

We welcome your comments or suggestions at leonard.sipes@csosa.gov.

The website for the Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency is http://www.csosa.gov/.

The program is hosted by Leonard Sipes. The producer is Timothy Barns.

Comments offered on “DC Public Safety” television and radio programs are the opinions of participants and do not necessarily represent the policies of CSOSA or other government agencies.

 

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Innovative Technology Solutions in Corrections

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DC Public Safety Radio and Television won the Government Customer Service Community of Practice (Cgov) 2014 Overall Excellence  and Best Use of technology Awards. See conta.cc/1qiBV74  .

DC Public Safety won awards for best podcast and audio from the National Association of Government Communicators in 2014, see http://www.nagconline.org/documents/NAGC-2014-Awards-Program.pdf . We are finalists for two new awards for 2015 for best podcast and audio.

DC Public Safety Television won three awards for public affairs television in 2014 from CTV and DCTV.

Welcome to “DC Public Safety” – Radio and television shows, blog and transcripts on crime, criminal offenders and the criminal justice system.

We received 230,000 visits in 2014.

Page views range from 653,000 to 1.4 million a year.

This is radio show 246.

The portal site for “DC Public Safety” is http://media.csosa.gov

Subscribe to “DC Public Safety” through iTunes.

Current Radio Program:

“Fostering Innovation in Community and Institutional Corrections,” is a new document from the RAND Corporation and the focus of this discussion.

Corrections agencies face major challenges from declining budgets, increasing populations under supervision, problems of equity and fairness in administrating justice, and other concerns. To better achieve its objectives and play its role within the criminal justice enterprise, the sector needs innovation in corrections technology, policy, and practice.

It identifies and prioritizes potential improvements in technology, policy, and practice in both community and institutional corrections. Some of the top-tier needs identified by the panel and researchers include adapting transcription and translation tools for the corrections environment, developing training for officers on best practices for managing offenders with mental health needs, and changing visitation policies (for example, using video visitation) to reduce opportunities for visitors to bring contraband into jails and prisons. Such high-priority needs provide a menu of innovation options for addressing key problems or capitalizing on emerging opportunities in the corrections sector. This report is part of a larger effort to assess and prioritize technology and related needs across the criminal justice community for the National Institute of Justice’s National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center System.

Those interviewed include Joe Russo, a researcher at the University of Denver focusing on technology issues in the corrections sector, and Brian Jackson, Director of Safety and Justice Program and Senior Physical Scientist at the RAND Corporation.

The document is available at http://www.rand.org/pubs/research_reports/RR820.html.

The website for the National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center is http://www.justnet.org.

The website for the RAND Corporation is http://www.rand.org.

Special Announcements:

A top priority for the Department of Justice is to invest in scientific research to ensure that the Department is both tough and smart on crime. The Office of Justice Programs’ CrimeSolutions.gov website shapes rigorous research into a central, reliable, and credible resource to inform practitioners and policy makers about what works in criminal justice.

A new website lists and evaluates prisoner re-entry programs nationwide. Launched by the Urban Institute, the Council of State Governments, and the John Jay College of Criminal Justice Prisoner Reentry Institute, the “What Works Clearinghouse” can be seen at http://nationalreentryresourcecenter.org/what_works.

The National Reentry Resource Center is a project of the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, US Department of Justice. Please see the Center’s website at http://www.nationalreentryresourcecenter.org/. Please see “Federal Interagency Reentry Council Launches Website, Releases Myth-Buster Series” on the front page of the site (see announcements). CSOSA is a member of the Council. Several requesters have asked for national research on reentry.

The Office of Justice Program’s National Institute of Justice reentry research portfolio supports the evaluation of innovative reentry programs. To access these studies and NIJ’s entire reentry research portfolio visit www.nij.gov/nij/topics/corrections/reentry/welcome.htm .

The Office of Violence Against Women offers stalking response tips for corrections, prosecutors, judges, law enforcement, victims and victim advocates. They are posted on OVW’s website at www.ovw.usdoj.gov .

The National Institute of Corrections Information Center is one of the largest repositories for corrections research and information in the country. See  www.nicic.gov/Library.

Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency:

We welcome your comments or suggestions at leonard.sipes@csosa.gov.

The website for the Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency is http://www.csosa.gov/.

The program is hosted by Leonard Sipes. The producer is Timothy Barns.

Comments offered on “DC Public Safety” television and radio programs are the opinions of participants and do not necessarily represent the policies of CSOSA or other government agencies.

Share