Veteran’s Treatment Courts-NIC-Event on May 17

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National Institute of Corrections Event on Veteran’s Courts on May 17. New Publication Available

http://community.nicic.gov/blogs/nic/archive/2016/05/05/register-today-nic-publication-release-webinar-quot-veterans-treatment-courts-a-second-chance-for-vets-who-have-lost-their-way-quot.aspx

Sentencing alternatives for veterans? There are dozens of specialized courts across the country that employ therapeutic programs to help keep veterans out of jail. “Veterans Treatment Courts: A Second Chance for Vets Who Have Lost Their Way” is a new publication that tells the story of these veterans and the judges, veterans advocates, and treatment professionals who are fighting to ensure a second chance for vets who find themselves caught up in the criminal justice system.

The publication was produced in partnership by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC), a division of the Federal Bureau of Prisons, and the Veterans Health Council of Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA). The report is based on a series of interviews and personal observations of the judges, veterans, and veterans advocates who have been intimately involved in the founding and operation of veterans treatment courts. In this book, they relay how veterans treatment courts are “the right thing to do” for justice-involved veterans who commit certain crimes associated with the lingering legacy of their wartime experiences.

Court staff and graduates of veterans treatment court programs  describe, in often exquisite detail, what their roles are and how they have come to embrace the concept that these courts, which use a carrot-and-stick approach to rehabilitate rather than overtly punish veteran defendants, represent what one veteran in Buffalo, New York, a key player in the creation of the first of these courts in the nation, has called “the most profound change in the attitude of our criminal justice system towards veterans in the history of this country.”

Objectives

Introduce NIC’s new publication “Veterans Treatment Courts: A Second Chance for Vets Who Have Lost Their Way”

Describe the inception of veteran’s treatment courts and their focus;

Highlight successes and challenges of veteran’s treatment courts; and

Hear a veteran’s personal story of the impact of veteran’s treatment court on their life

This publication was authored by Bernard Edelman, Deputy Director for Policy and Government Affairs, VVA; and consultant Dr. Tom Berger, Executive Director of VVA’s Veterans Health Council.

Radio Show

DC Public Safety Radio won the 2015 awards for best podcast and best audio from the National Association of Government Communicators.

DC Public Safety Radio and Television won the Government Customer Service Community of Practice (Cgov) 2014 Overall Excellence and Best Use of technology Awards. See conta.cc/1qiBV74 . We also won the award for Best Teamwork for 2015. 

DC Public Safety Television won two top awards for public affairs television in 2015 from DCTV and three additional first-place awards in 2014.

Welcome to “DC Public Safety” – Radio and television shows, blog and transcripts on crime, criminal offenders, and the criminal justice system.

For FY 2013 through FY 2015, we recorded 218,700 unique visitors, 633,000 visits and 1,924,300 page views (excluding robot searches).

This is radio show 277.

The portal site for “DC Public Safety” is http://media.csosa.gov

Subscribe to “DC Public Safety” through iTunes.

Current Radio Program:

We interviewed Bernie Edelman, Deputy Director for Policy and Government Affairs for Vietnam Veterans of America and Stephen Amos, Chief of the Jails Division at the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) along with Greg Crawford, Correctional Program Specialist at NIC about Veteran Treatment Courts. Please see the link at the beginning of this announcement for information about how to register for the May 17, 2016 live event for the release of “Veterans Treatment Courts: A Second Chance for Vets Who Have Lost Their Way.”

In this podcast, the guests discussed the value of these courts; saving worthy lives, restoring families, and saving taxpayer dollars.  A Second Chance illuminates an evolving facet of the criminal justice system and highlights innovative practices in these diversionary programs across the country.  Using “A Second Chance” as a platform for all NIC veteran-specific initiatives, our guests also discussed the critical importance of continuity of care in jails and intent to expand veterans initiatives across this continuum.

To learn more about veterans initiatives at NIC, please visit the veterans web page of the National Institute of Corrections: http://www.nicic.gov/veterans.

Special Announcements:

A top priority for the Department of Justice is to invest in scientific research to ensure that the Department is both tough and smart on crime. The Office of Justice Programs’ CrimeSolutions.gov website shapes rigorous research into a central, reliable, and credible resource to inform practitioners and policy makers about what works in criminal justice.

A new website lists and evaluates prisoner re-entry programs nationwide. Launched by the Urban Institute, the Council of State Governments, and the John Jay College of Criminal Justice Prisoner Reentry Institute, the “What Works Clearinghouse” can be seen at http://nationalreentryresourcecenter.org/what_works.

The National Reentry Resource Center is a project of the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, US Department of Justice. Please see the Center’s website at http://www.nationalreentryresourcecenter.org/. Please see “Federal Interagency Reentry Council Launches Website, Releases Myth-Buster Series” on the front page of the site (see announcements). CSOSA is a member of the Council. Several requesters have asked for national research on reentry.

The Office of Justice Program’s National Institute of Justice reentry research portfolio supports the evaluation of innovative reentry programs. To access these studies and NIJ’s entire reentry research portfolio visit www.nij.gov/nij/topics/corrections/reentry/welcome.htm .

The Office of Violence Against Women offers stalking response tips for corrections, prosecutors, judges, law enforcement, victims and victim advocates. They are posted on OVW’s website at www.ovw.usdoj.gov .

The National Institute of Corrections Information Center is one of the largest repositories for corrections research and information in the country. See  www.nicic.gov/Library.

Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency:

We welcome your comments or suggestions at leonard.sipes@csosa.gov.

The website for the Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency is http://www.csosa.gov/.

The program is hosted by Leonard Sipes. The producer is Timothy Barns.

Comments offered on “DC Public Safety” television and radio programs are the opinions of participants and do not necessarily represent the policies of CSOSA or other government agencies.

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The Growth of Veterans Treatment Courts

csosa

DC Public Safety Radio won the 2015 awards for best podcast and best audio from the National Association of Government Communicators.

DC Public Safety Radio and Television won the Government Customer Service Community of Practice (Cgov) 2014 Overall Excellence and Best Use of technology Awards. See conta.cc/1qiBV74  .

DC Public Safety Television won three top awards for public affairs television in 2014 from CTV and DCTV.

Welcome to “DC Public Safety” – Radio and television shows, blog and transcripts on crime, criminal offenders, and the criminal justice system.

For FY 2013 through FY 2015, we recorded 218,700 unique visitors, 633,000 visits and 1,924,300 page views (excluding robot searches).

This is radio show 263.

The portal site for “DC Public Safety” is http://media.csosa.gov

Subscribe to “DC Public Safety” through iTunes.

See transcript at http://media.csosa.gov/podcast/transcripts/2016/03/veteran-treatment-courts/

Current Radio Program:

Veterans Treatment Courts are one of the fastest growing criminal justice programs in the United States.  Since 9/11, more than 2.5 million Americans have served our country in uniform. Many of them have deployed several times. And many of these men and women in uniform are coming home and struggling not only with the physical wounds of war, but also its “invisible” wounds: post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury.

Since the inception of the first Veterans Treatment Court by Judge Robert Russell in Buffalo, NY in 2008, there are now more than 300 veterans treatment courts across the country.  These courts account for veterans’ military service and provide diversion and treatment alternatives specific to their needs.

The development of a screening tool specific to veterans is now underway through partnership between the National Institute of Corrections (NIC), the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) and the Center for Court Innovation (CCI). The assessment tool factors in the latest research on trauma and will support an accompanying case planning protocol. This Veterans Treatment Court Enhancement Initiative is a three-year project that will include implementing the tool and protocol in two pilot sites. The pilot site solicitation opportunity will be released in November 2015.

Our guests include Director of Treatment Court Programs at CCI, Aaron Arnold; Associate Deputy Director for BJA, Ruby Qazilbash; and Correctional Program Specialist from NIC, Greg Crawford.

The websites for NIC, BJA and CCI:

National Institute of Corrections: http://nicic.gov/ or link to NIC broadcast on veterans:

Veterans Treatment Courts: A Second Chance for Vets Who Have Lost Their Way http://nicic.gov/library/029869

Bureau of Justice Assistance: https://www.bja.gov/

Center for Court Innovation:  http://www.courtinnovation.org/

Special Announcements:

A top priority for the Department of Justice is to invest in scientific research to ensure that the Department is both tough and smart on crime. The Office of Justice Programs’ CrimeSolutions.gov website shapes rigorous research into a central, reliable, and credible resource to inform practitioners and policy makers about what works in criminal justice.

A new website lists and evaluates prisoner re-entry programs nationwide. Launched by the Urban Institute, the Council of State Governments, and the John Jay College of Criminal Justice Prisoner Reentry Institute, the “What Works Clearinghouse” can be seen at http://nationalreentryresourcecenter.org/what_works.

The National Reentry Resource Center is a project of the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, US Department of Justice. Please see the Center’s website at http://www.nationalreentryresourcecenter.org/. Please see “Federal Interagency Reentry Council Launches Website, Releases Myth-Buster Series” on the front page of the site (see announcements). CSOSA is a member of the Council. Several requesters have asked for national research on reentry.

The Office of Justice Program’s National Institute of Justice reentry research portfolio supports the evaluation of innovative reentry programs. To access these studies and NIJ’s entire reentry research portfolio visit www.nij.gov/nij/topics/corrections/reentry/welcome.htm .

The Office of Violence Against Women offers stalking response tips for corrections, prosecutors, judges, law enforcement, victims and victim advocates. They are posted on OVW’s website at www.ovw.usdoj.gov .

The National Institute of Corrections Information Center is one of the largest repositories for corrections research and information in the country. See  www.nicic.gov/Library.

Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency:

We welcome your comments or suggestions at leonard.sipes@csosa.gov.

The website for the Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency is http://www.csosa.gov/.

The program is hosted by Leonard Sipes. The producer is Timothy Barns.

Comments offered on “DC Public Safety” television and radio programs are the opinions of participants and do not necessarily represent the policies of CSOSA or other government agencies.

 

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Drug Court in Washington, D.C.

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DC Public Safety Radio and Television won the Government Customer Service Community of Practice (Cgov) 2014 Overall Excellence  and Best Use of technology Awards. See  .

DC Public Safety won awards for best podcast and audio from the National Association of Government Communicators in 2014, see http://www.nagconline.org/documents/NAGC-2014-Awards-Program.pdf .

DC Public Safety Television won three awards for public affairs television in 2014 from CTV and DCTV.

Welcome to “DC Public Safety” – Radio and television shows, blog and transcripts on crime, criminal offenders and the criminal justice system.

We received 230,000 visits in 2014.

Page views range from 653,000 to 1.4 million a year.

This is radio show 234.

The portal site for “DC Public Safety” is http://media.csosa.gov

Transcript available at http://media.csosa.gov/podcast/transcripts/2015/03/superior-courts-drug-court-program-in-washington-d-c/

Subscribe to “DC Public Safety” through iTunes.

Current Radio Program:

The program interviewed the Honorable Gregory Jackson, Associate Judge, Superior Court of the District of Columbia who presides over the Drug Court program and “Gene,” a graduate of the program.

The Superior Court Drug Intervention Program (“Drug Court”) is a special court calendar designed to handle cases involving substance dependant or addicted defendants with nonviolent misdemeanor and low-level felony charges. The Drug Court is managed by the Pretrial Services Agency. The program offers participants a comprehensive approach to address their addiction or dependency. Drug Court includes supervision, drug testing, treatment services, and immediate sanctions and incentives.

The website for the DC Courts is http://www.dccourts.gov/internet/ ; the courts’ webpage on Drug Court is: http://www.dccourts.gov/internet/public/aud_criminal/drugcourt.jsf .

Transcript at http://media.csosa.gov/podcast/transcripts/2015/03/superior-courts-drug-court-program-in-washington-d-c/

Special Announcements:

A top priority for Attorney General Eric Holder’s Department of Justice is to invest in scientific research to ensure that the Department is both tough and smart on crime. The Office of Justice Programs’ CrimeSolutions.gov website shapes rigorous research into a central, reliable, and credible resource to inform practitioners and policy makers about what works in criminal justice.

A new website lists and evaluates prisoner re-entry programs nationwide. Launched by the Urban Institute, the Council of State Governments, and the John Jay College of Criminal Justice Prisoner Reentry Institute, the “What Works Clearinghouse” can be seen at http://nationalreentryresourcecenter.org/what_works.

The National Reentry Resource Center is a project of the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, US Department of Justice. Please see the Center’s website at http://www.nationalreentryresourcecenter.org/. Please see “Federal Interagency Reentry Council Launches Website, Releases Myth-Buster Series” on the front page of the site (see announcements). CSOSA is a member of the Council. Several requesters have asked for national research on reentry.

The Office of Justice Program’s National Institute of Justice reentry research portfolio supports the evaluation of innovative reentry programs. To access these studies and NIJ’s entire reentry research portfolio visit www.nij.gov/nij/topics/corrections/reentry/welcome.htm .

The Office of Violence Against Women offers stalking response tips for corrections, prosecutors, judges, law enforcement, victims and victim advocates. They are posted on OVW’s website at www.ovw.usdoj.gov .

The National Institute of Corrections Information Center is one of the largest repositories for corrections research and information in the country. See  www.nicic.gov/Library.

Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency:

We welcome your comments or suggestions at leonard.sipes@csosa.gov.

The website for the Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency is http://www.csosa.gov/.

The program is hosted by Leonard Sipes. The producer is Timothy Barns.

Comments offered on “DC Public Safety” television and radio programs are the opinions of participants and do not necessarily represent the policies of CSOSA or other government agencies.

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Fathering Court in Washington, D.C.-DC Public Safety Radio

Welcome to “DC Public Safety” – Radio and television shows, blog and transcripts on crime, criminal offenders and the criminal justice system.

We received 1.4 million page views in 2012.

This is radio show 180.

Transcript available at http://media.csosa.gov/podcast/transcripts/2013/07/fathering-court-in-washington-d-c-dc-public-safety-radio/

The portal site for “DC Public Safety” is http://media.csosa.gov.

Subscribe to “DC Public Safety” through iTunes.

Current Radio Program:

The program interviews The Honorable Milton C. Lee, Jr., who presides over the Fathering Court program in D.C.  The  Fathering Court is one of a number of problem-solving courts within the DC Superior Court.

The Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency offers supporting services to Fathering Court.

The website for the DC Superior Court is http://www.dccourts.gov/internet/superior/main.jsf. More information about DC’s fathering  court can be found here:  http://www.dccourts.gov/internet/superior/org_family/fatheringcourt.jsf

Special Announcements:

A top priority for Attorney General Eric Holder’s Department of Justice is to invest in scientific research to ensure that the Department is both tough and smart on crime. The Office of Justice Programs’ CrimeSolutions.gov website shapes rigorous research into a central, reliable, and credible resource to inform practitioners and policy makers about what works in criminal justice.

A new website lists and evaluates prisoner re-entry programs nationwide. Launched yesterday by the Urban Institute, the Council of State Governments, and the John Jay College of Criminal Justice Prisoner Reentry Institute, the “What Works Clearinghouse” can be seen at http://nationalreentryresourcecenter.org/what_works.

The National Reentry Resource Center is a project of the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, US Department of Justice. Please see the Center’s website at http://www.nationalreentryresourcecenter.org/. Please see “Federal Interagency Reentry Council Launches Website, Releases Myth-Buster Series” on the front page of the site (see announcements). CSOSA is a member of the Council.

Several requesters have asked for national research on reentry. The Office of Justice Program’s National Institute of Justice reentry research portfolio supports the evaluation of innovative reentry programs. To access these studies and NIJ’s entire reentry research portfolio visit www.nij.gov/nij/topics/corrections/reentry/welcome.htm .

The Office of Violence Against Women offers stalking response tips for corrections, prosecutors, judges, law enforcement, victims and victim advocates. They are posted on OVW’s website at www.ovw.usdoj.gov .

The National Institute of Corrections Information Center is one of the largest repositories for corrections research and information in the country. See  www.nicic.gov/Library.

Correctional Social Media:

The Pew Center on the States Public Safety Performance Project offers a video on research to reduce recidivism as well as brief but powerful overviews of reentry and sentencing research. See http://www.pewstates.org/projects/public-safety-performance-project-328068 .

The U.S. DOJ Center for Faith-Based & Neighborhood Partnerships recently held two successful webinars on Faith and Community Based approaches to Reentry and Responsible Fatherhood Initiatives. Click the links below to watch/listen to these informative webinars.

  1.  Faith and Community Based Approaches to Responsible Fatherhood and its Impact on Delinquency Prevention, see https://bjatraining.org/2012/04/10/faith-and-community-based-approaches-responsible-fatherhood-and-its-impact-delinquency
  2. A Look at Faith & Community-Based Approaches to Offender Reentry, seehttps://bjatraining.org/a-look-at-faith-community-based-approaches-to-offender-reentry

The Louisiana Department of Corrections/Division of Probation and Parole is offering radio shows on offender reentry. Please visit their website athttp://doc.la.gov/pages/reentry-initiatives/reentry-radio/ .

The New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services offers podcasts at http://www.criminaljustice.ny.gov/pio/podcasts.html.

The Minnesota Department of Corrections offers a YouTube channel at http://m.youtube.com/user/minnesotadoc .

The Facebook page for the Rhode Island Department of Corrections ishttps://www.facebook.com/pages/Rhode-Island-Department-of-Corrections/400377866663063

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation Facebook Page is  http://www.facebook.com/cacorrections .The Twitter page is  http://twitter.com/cacorrections .

Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency:

We welcome your comments or suggestions at leonard.sipes@csosa.gov.

The website for the Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency is http://www.csosa.gov/.

The program is hosted by Leonard Sipes. The producer is Timothy Barnes.

 

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Reinventing the Criminal Justice System-Justice Reinvestment-Urban Institute-DC Public Safety

Welcome to “DC Public Safety” – Radio and television shows, blog and transcripts on crime, criminal offenders and the criminal justice system.

We receive tens-of-thousands of page views every month.

This is radio show 170.

The portal site for “DC Public Safety” is http://media.csosa.gov.

Subscribe to “DC Public Safety” through iTunes.

Transcript available at http://media.csosa.gov/podcast/transcripts/2013/03/reinventing-the-criminal-justice-system-justice-reinvestment-urban-institute-dc-public-safety/

Current Radio Program: 

The program interviews Dr. Nancy G. La Vigne (http://www.urban.org/bio/NancyGLaVigne.html) Director, Justice Policy Center, The Urban Institute regarding Justice Reinvestment.

With state and local governments grappling with growing corrections costs and budget shortfalls, they are asking how they can reduce costs and get a better return on criminal justice investments while maintaining public safety.

One answer is Justice Reinvestment, a collaborative, data-driven approach to criminal justice planning that yields savings that can be invested in evidence-based, prevention-oriented activities.

Dr. La Vigne describes this complex but compelling model highlighting the experiences of 17 states and 16 localities.

The website for the Urban Institute is http://www.urban.org

Special Announcements:

A top priority for Attorney General Eric Holder’s Department of Justice is to invest in scientific research to ensure that the Department is both tough and smart on crime. The Office of Justice Programs’ CrimeSolutions.gov website shapes rigorous research into a central, reliable, and credible resource to inform practitioners and policy makers about what works in criminal justice.

A new website lists and evaluates prisoner re-entry programs nationwide. Launched yesterday by the Urban Institute, the Council of State Governments, and the John Jay College of Criminal Justice Prisoner Reentry Institute, the “What Works Clearinghouse” can be seen at http://nationalreentryresourcecenter.org/what_works.

The National Reentry Resource Center is a project of the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, US Department of Justice. Please see the Center’s website at http://www.nationalreentryresourcecenter.org/. Please see “Federal Interagency Reentry Council Launches Website, Releases Myth-Buster Series” on the front page of the site (see announcements). CSOSA is a member of the Council.

Several requesters have asked for national research on reentry. The Office of Justice Program’s National Institute of Justice reentry research portfolio supports the evaluation of innovative reentry programs. To access these studies and NIJ’s entire reentry research portfolio visit www.nij.gov/nij/topics/corrections/reentry/welcome.htm .

Correctional Social Media:

The Pew Center on the States Public Safety Performance Project offers a video on research to reduce recidivism as well as brief but powerful overviews of reentry and sentencing research. See http://www.pewstates.org/projects/public-safety-performance-project-328068 .

The U.S. DOJ Center for Faith-Based & Neighborhood Partnerships recently held two successful webinars on Faith and Community Based approaches to Reentry and Responsible Fatherhood Initiatives. Click the links below to watch/listen to these informative webinars.

  1. Faith and Community Based Approaches to Responsible Fatherhood and its Impact on Delinquency Prevention, see https://bjatraining.org/2012/04/10/faith-and-community-based-approaches-responsible-fatherhood-and-its-impact-delinquency
  2. A Look at Faith & Community-Based Approaches to Offender Reentry, seehttps://bjatraining.org/a-look-at-faith-community-based-approaches-to-offender-reentry

The Louisiana Department of Corrections/Division of Probation and Parole is offering radio shows on offender reentry. Please visit their website athttp://doc.la.gov/pages/reentry-initiatives/reentry-radio/ .

The New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services offers podcasts at http://www.criminaljustice.ny.gov/pio/podcasts.html.

The Minnesota Department of Corrections offers a YouTube channel at http://m.youtube.com/user/minnesotadoc .

The Facebook page for the Rhode Island Department of Corrections ishttps://www.facebook.com/pages/Rhode-Island-Department-of-Corrections/400377866663063

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation Facebook Page is  http://www.facebook.com/cacorrections .The Twitter page is  http://twitter.com/cacorrections .

Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency:

We welcome your comments or suggestions at leonard.sipes@csosa.gov.

The website for the Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency is http://www.csosa.gov/.

The program is hosted by Leonard Sipes. The producer is Timothy Barnes.

Comments offered on “DC Public Safety” television and radio programs are the opinions of participants and do not necessarily represent the policies of CSOSA or other government agencies.

Share